Friday, May 26, 2006

Nashville Talent

Nashville Talent is a great new resource that will save you time and money. If you are like most musicians, you are "working class" and barely have time to network with other musicians. Nashville Talent is a community of songwriters, and this site gives you the freedom to co- write and share your songs with musicians from all over the world. This site is totally Free, and we believe that it is time for people to share their talent, and come together to make something great happen. We have A featured country vocalist named Jeff Hunt who just moved here to Nashville, and has teamed up with grand ole opey's favorite songwriter, Wade Jackson who wrote Stonewall Jackson's first hit "Don't be Angry". Since has won 2 BMI awards. Jeff's new released album "Unstoppable" is awesome and has gained some popularity in the town. I am excited to see new musicians bring something great to the table, and offer a place to meet, co- write, and share in this wonderful gift. If you are gifted with musical talent, come on by, and share in our community.~fanny aliff

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Thursday, May 25, 2006

Co - Write Online...Save Time and $$

If you are a musician that is tiard of unproductive expensive musicians web sites that have been unproductive, well you have come to the right place! Click on the banner above, and you will get what you have been looking for! A compleatly FREE musicians resource that you create! Nashville Talent would be nothing with out your talent! So please come join in and connect with others just like you. "It takes a team to make somthing great" Nashville Talent will save you time and money, so what do you have to loose? Absoulty nothing. ~fanny

Saturday, May 20, 2006

These Are Some Of the Services That I Provide To Musicians

Marketing Guru Independent labels publishing entertainment marketing public relations services in: artist development publishing in-house-booking national distribution event planing raido tours promotion production and more advertising graphic design media photography web design artist marketing full service graphic and website design and hosting photo retouching quicktime and mp3

Key Words For Music Marketing Information

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FIND ME ON MYSPACE

Music BUSINESS LESSONS

Music BUSINESS LESSONS
Hank Cochran: Written songs for: George Jones. George Strait. Lefty Frizzell. Kris Kristofferson. Linda Ronstadt. Ricky Van Shelton. Jimmy Buffett. Hank Williams Jr., Patsy Cline. LeAnn Rimes. Lee Ann Womack. Waylon Jennings and Trace Adkins Just to name a few: How you run your life is yours and how I run my life is mine. I thank the good Lord I have been a little successful. I'd say if you want to get into anything, figure out for yourself what you want to do. Let everyone know exactly what you want to do, and get after it. Stay with it, and just be determined enough to know what your going to have to do. People will help you even if they don't like you. Because if you're that determined, they know you're going to be successful. Do the best you can the A & R men now want to hear a full production. Even on the pitch sheet it says don't bring in a simple demo. They want a full blown hit sounding recording--1 think so they can just copy it. I've cut demos and pitched them. They take the demo into the studio and cut it with no changes. The majority of the big songs I have had recorded are just me and the guitar. Willie Nelson and I would go in and do 15 or 20 songs in 3 hours. Run it through, then I'd ask if it was something he wanted to make a master out of. Willie would say no and we'd go on to the next one. Keep after it!.
.Bart Harbinson Executive Director of Nashville Songwriters Association International.. "This period of time for writers and any creators involved in the process of making a record, is the biggest evolution in how we make, deliver, and get paid for music since Thomas Edison recorded "Mary Had A Little Lamb." Next year Congress decides whether your music is given away for free or not on sites like Napster, and MP3.com. There is a state tax issue where they want to place a $.06 per dollar song tax on songwriters, and we are not going to let that happen. That is why we exist at NSAI-- to protect the songwriters. We have 105 workshops around the country, and a free one every Thursday night here in Nashville that has produced successes such as Jon Vezner (Grammy Winning songwriter), Mark D. Sanders (Songwriter of the Year) Mark Shelby & Tia Sillers (Single of the Year) We are there. I even had songwriters say when they die they want to go to NSAI. We are the songwriters home. We will treat you right, love ya, and give you a place to work, live and grow."
Beverly Ross Writer of "Judy's Turn To Cry". "Lollipop". "Candyman". "If you know your emotional, psychological and spiritual core is that you are a songwriter, you must not deny it, because you have a calling.You basically need to allow this dominant face to guide you. And in surrendering to this internal mechanism or urge, you basically need to jump into the fire of the artistic challenge, political intrigue and prejudice, rivalry, greed and potential recognition which all comprise the "consuming soup" laced with financial limbo or instant wealth that are the core of investing oneself into the music business. The essential character qualities are resilience and boldness. I believe we are chosen by a higher power to create for humanity joy through songs. I have recently created a workshop entitled "David & The Ten Commandments Of Songwriting" It is based on the premises that the young shep-ard DAVID has exquisite musical gifts and GOD looked with joy upon his making of the sound of music. Commandment #1- learn to love rejection, because that's what you get the most of and be able to convert the energy of that pain into re-crafting, re-thinking, re-writing & improving the song." Please write to: B Ross Workshop P.O. Box 120954 Nashville, TN37212
Merle Kilgore W/ Merle Kilgore Management "The best advice that I can give to a newcomer is to make sure that you have the desire and determination. It takes time to make it in this business. That coupled with a true love for music itself will help get you started." Kirk Roth Songs Recorded by: Tim McGraw, Tracy Lawrence, Hank Cochran, Willie Nelson, & Bobby Bare: The only advice I can give is this, "Cultivate the old, for there is no better teacher than the great songs of yesterday themselves, and never underestimate the power in networking. The success I have had all stems from personal relationships God Bless."

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SongWriting Quotes

SONGWRITING QUOTES Don Goodman writer of "Angels Among Us" by Alabama, "OP Red" by Blake Shelton, "Ring On Her Finger, Time On Her Hands" by Reba McEntire. "A stroke of genius ... is a moment of perfec-tion achieved through a life time of practice. I feel that for every 100 songs I write, 99 are prepara-tion for the 1 that is truly inspired!" Duane Hitchings Credits: #1's with Rod Stewart including "Infatuation" & "Da Ya Think I'm Sexy", Grammy Award Winner for His Work on Flashdance with Kim Games "I'll Be Where The Heart Is", Numerous Charting songs with Alice Cooper, Steve Perry etc. latest hit is T.L.C.'s "Unpretty", currently working with Brooks & Dunn and Rod Stewart among others.) "Well there are several factors that contributed to my personal 'success' in the music industry: A. I am so old I knew everyone before they made it and thus had their phone numbers (my advice, write with producers & artists themselves without the middle man). B. I have always stayed on top of technology and have always owned my own personal state of the art digital recording studio in which I play all the instrument parts myself (make your demos "cost effective"). C. Over the years I have developed a calcium deposit on my forehead approx. 2 to 3 inches thick, this is a direct result of banging my head against various stone structures until they gave (Maintain composure under stress & develop a strong determination). D. Live on a boat (always have a plan of escape). Tony Toliver Credits Include: Curb Recording Artist w/ rising Tide Records & Polgram. "My advice to new artists and writers is get with other writers that know how to write. You might have a few good lines, but you will waste a lot of time trying to do it on your own. For example, doctors get with other j doctors, and pilots get with other pilots to get their opinion and their view so that they can combine their , \ thoughts into words. The same goes for songwriters. Knock on their door, mow their lawn if you ; have to, but just get to know them." j Harlan Howard Credits Include: "I Fall To Pieces" "Busted" "Heartaches by the Number" and ; many more ledgendary songs. "I take a whole life story and compress into 3 minutes. There's no < school for it. It would be great if you knew how to play an instrument. Also it would be great if you knew how to play by ear, and knew when to change chords and so forth and had at least a decent singing voice so you could show people how the song went. That helps a lot. But, you learn about songwriting from radio & records. Just listen to how all the masters have done it on your favorite songs through the years. I used to memorize songs from Tin Pan Alley and Ernest Tubb when I was ; a little kid. I actually know more of Ernest Tubb's songs than I know of my own, after all these ^ years. But that's how I learned to write and studied the structure and the phrasing and the little , tricks they did that got my attention, and little punch lines - Three chords and the truth." > Hank Williams (1923-1953) "A song ain't nothing in the world but a story | just written with music to it." '^ Vern Gosdin "I tend to average about 10 hit songs per ex-wife". Willie Nelson "I'd say 99 percent has come from my own experience. A person could probably start from my first song and go all the way to my last- if he knew wh at to look for - and write my autobiography". Tom T. Hall "Make your melodies simple enough so that the average person can hum them". Conway Twitty (1933-1993) "It's not the singer it's the song". Johnny Cash "Mama songs are always good for country music". Roger Miller (136-1992) It took me six weeks to write "King of The Road". I was driving from Davenport Iowa, to Chicago and somewhere along the way I saw a sign on the road which read Trailers for sale or rent'," and for some reason that phrase stuck in my mind. It wasn't until later in Boise Idaho, that I really set down and made something out of it although I had to induce labor to get it completed. I got stuck after the first verse, So I went out to a Boise store and bought a statuette of a hobo. I set and stared at it until the rest of the tune came to me.

Music Terms

Music Terms ' A&R Artist & Repertoire A&R discover new artists or songs. PersonalUtaTiager A career guide'for the Mist. AOR Album Oriented Rock: Rock radio format that empha- Pitch: The perceived location of a musical sound with- sizes album tracks over singles Artist Roster: A list of artists under contract to a record company, management or booking agency. ASCAP: American Society of Composers, Authors & Pub-• lishers. A Performing rights organization. , Attorney / Music: lawyers with expert knowledge in areas i such as contracts, copyrights, trademarks... ' ; BMI: Broadcast Music Inc. A performing rights organization. I Booking agent: seeks work for singers, entertainers. in the audible frequency range (low to high) a function of frequency. Playlist: A radio station ranked list (or system of lists) showing which recording make up the chief programming material for a given week. Press Kits: A promotional package containing publicity photographs, a resume, short biography, reviews. Public Relations: (PR) Relating the client to the public. Chart: The ranking of records, based on sales, frequency of PromoPack: Package of promotional material. airplay, published in trade periodicals. The chord structure and arrangement of a song used in Nashville recording sessions. Compilation Collection of different artists as a package. Co-Publishing: When a copyright's publishing rights are shared by more than one publisher. Copyright: Literally, the right to copy or reproduce one's Publicist: A person who publicizes an artist or situation Record Producer: The organizer of recording, aranges musicians, secures recording studio, arranger, engineer rehearse the artist, finds songs and creates final product. Remix: To mix a multichannel product again to obtain own artistic or intellectual property. In practice, it is the body a different sound. of exclusive rights granted by law to the owners of such property. Cut: When a major recording artist records a song. Demo: A demonstration recording. It is a sample of the finished product, used to sell an artist or a song. Engineer: Technician involved in the recording process. Hook: The repetitive part of a song that is most remembered when people think about the tune & the title. Hype: Extensive publicity used to promote acts, new records. Jingle: A song intended to advertise a particular popular product over radio or TV, generally found in a commercial spot. Label: "record company" although one record company may release & or distribute records under more than one label. Royalty: An artist's composer's compensation for writers share in the profits received from the sale for performance of his work. Scale: Union minimum pay. Second Engineer: Assists the main engineer SESAC: The newest of the three performing rights organizations in the United States Session: A recording session. A block of time during a recording may be made. Generally in 3 hour blocks. Set: A number of songs played consecutively by a musician or group, usually 45-75 minutes in length. Showcase: A place of entertainment where entertainers perform to promote their talents and/or songs to potential users. Song-plugger: A person who actively seeks to get a song recorded + or performed by presenting songs to Lead Sheet: The words, music and chorus of a song. Lead- producers, artists and managers. sheets are required for copyright purpoes. Lyrics: The words of a song. Master: A finished product that can be turned into a record. Mechanical License: The license that a record Company applies for from a publisher to legally issue a song or a record. Mechanical Royalties: A fee paid by a record manafactor 1 to the publisher of a song or selection for each record and : tapes as well as electrical transcription and audio tapes for broadcast and background purposes. Mixdown: To take a multitrack master and reduce to a stereo Modulation: Changing the key of a song from it's starting pitch. Mastering: Final adjustment of EQ, level, compression, song order, before pressing CD master. Over Dub: To add 1 or more new tracks of sound to a tape that contains previously recorded material. Technically, the process is called Sel Synchronization.. Sound Recording: In copyright law, a particular recorded performance, considered as an artistic work and' therefore' qualifying for a copyright protection. Talent Agencies: To obtain employment artist, live performances, club concerts, TV/Radio appearances, stage product (musicals), motion pictures, recording and advertising spots. Tip Sheets: Refers to any of a number of weekly publications distributed to record companies and radio companies & radio stations program directors with prediction of future hits. A schedule of major recording artists. Major recording artist schedule of recording, type of songs theyre looking for.producer.record label, contact ,date. Venue: The location of a public performance. Voice Over: The voice of an unseen announcer for a commercial, or for a narrtion.

Wednesday, May 17, 2006

Nashville Talent

Tuesday, May 16, 2006

Song Writting Tips......

R.C.Bannon Award winning songwriter To me songwriting is a business and should be approached as such. No different than selling shoes at Sears, or working at IBM. I get up every morning at 6:30 am, grab a Diet Dr Pepper, Nordictrack, Shower and go upstairs to my loft and go to work. I do not wait for inspiration to hit. If I wrote only when I was inspired, I wouldn't even write five songs a year. You have to be diligent. I write for money, but money is not why I write. I would write even if I never made a dime. But because it is my chosen profession, I treat it as a business. This doesn't work for everyone, but it works for me. I go to a lot of movies, and in my pockets, beside the milk duds that I sneak in, you will find a small tape recorder. Remember some creative mind wrote this script. So more than likely you're going to hear a phrase that will trigger a song thought. The best advice I can give writers new or old, BE AWARE." Jim Turbo Kirbv Piano & Organ For Roy Orbison 1981-88/ Session Plaver "Go to Nashville, LA or NY, if you are serious about the business find out who and what the biz is all about". Marty Brown Credits include: Crying. Loving & Leaving. I'm From The Country. High & Dry. "There are two keys: 1. How much you love something and 2.How much you believe in what you are doing. Before anyone else can believe in you, you have to believe in yourself, in what you are doing, in what you are singing and what you are writing along with your belief in the Lord. Surround yourself with successful people not only in the music business, but anyone who is successful. Nine times out of ten if you are around successful people you will be successful as well. I have learned this first hand. I have slept with the bums in the alley and eaten dinner with George Jones. I have been from one extreme to the other. Find where your niche is. Find out who the big wigs are and hang out with them " I told my Dad when I grow up I want to be a musician. He said, 'Son, you can't do both.' Chet Atkins. C.G.P. Don Wayne Songwriting credits include: "Country Bumpkin" (Faron Young), Songs cut by: Hank Williams Jr., Eddie Arnold, Loretta Lynn, Conway Twitty. "Hard work, a lot of talent and persistence are the most important keys in attaining success as a songwriter. However, I don't believe in self-made successful people. I think luck and cir­cumstances have a lot of bearing on the ups and downs of songwriting." Randal PatrJC Screenplay writer "The Gift", "Return To Sender", "Living Legend" "Gam­bler III" Creative Consultant Author of "Hollywood USA" Writer of" White Trash in a Trailer Park". "Writing has one requirement: put your butt in the chair everyday - the rest will take care of itself." Rebecca Holden -Actress. Entertainer. Songwriter (Star of NBC's Knight Rider. General Hospital and Former Breck Girl) " Having worked with top actors, talent agen­cies and television networks in both New York and Los Angeles, I find that Nashville has so much talent, it's really a 'third coast' It's finally good to see companies such as Nash-Angeles Inc. with connections to Los Angeles being able offer opportunities to the talent pool here in Nashville." Randy Boudreaux Award Winning Producer/ Songwriter for: Tracv Lawrence. George Jones. Neal McCov. Clay Walker: "Keep your eyes on the moon but reach for the stars, just go & follow your dreams." Mary W. Francis - award-winning sonawriter. Her hits include "Whiskey If You Were A Woman" (Highway 101) and "Tonight The Heartaches On Me" (The Dixie Chicks) "When you first get to town, go to as many music orientated places as you can. Listen 95% of the time and talk 5%. If you have a song, and people tell you they don't get it -hold on to that one- it is your hit. Every instinct in you will tell you to give up your dream right before you make it big.. Hang tough; it is always darkest before the dawn.

Take A Look Around

Nashville Talent is a site promoting Nashville Talented Sonwriters. Sponsered By Wade Jackson, Stonewall Jackson's Older brother who wrote and co/ wrote Stonewall's greatest Hits in Nashville, TN. Wade is a consultant for the Nashville country sene sill today helping country musicians save hundreds, and even thousands of dollars in the music buss!

Saturday, May 13, 2006

The "legendary"

Born in a logging camp near Marion, South Carolina, he has been a professional entertainer for more than 42 years, starting long before his enlistment in the military service. Then, all the time he could spare was spent in entertaining his GI buddies all over the world, and on local radio and TV shows when possible.

No traveling conditions, working conditions, or inadequate personal accommodations have ever slowed him down or kept him away from doing a show for his fellow troops, or for any other live audience for that matter.

From the frozen winters in Grafenwehr, Germany to the rice paddies of Korea, Wade has performed and organized off duty GI bands to play country music shows indoors and outdoors in all kinds of weather.

But Wades work and talent for entertaining were not really known to the American people here at home until he started recording professionally and making personal appearances on shows all over the United States and Canada in the Fall of 1966.

Since Wades discharge from the military service, he has hung up his be medaled uniform, and explodes onto the stage to do his show with more instruments than it looks possible to carry. To name a few, fiddle, banjo, guitar, harmonica, mandolin, and anything else he can find on the stage. And he never does the show the same way twice.

Wade has organized so many bands in the military service, also teaching each man his own instruments, that he seems to have an infinite patience and understanding ability to work with any band, anywhere.

Many of the top stars all over the nation, who know Wade, kid him a little when they work on the same stage with him, because he has the showmanship ability to completely steal the show. Be careful of this entertainer, watching him perform and listening to him sing is habit forming.

Incidentally, Wade Jackson is one of the most celebrated Country songwriters and has material to his credit, which has been recorded by Sonny James, George Jones, Ernest Tubb, Roy Acuff, Stonewall Jackson and many other artists. The first song he ever wrote was "Don't Be Angry."

Wade travels all over with the Grand Ole Opry Road Shows every summer, and makes his base of operations at his home in Gallatin, Tennessee, only 27 miles from Nashville.

DON'T EVER MISS A CHANCE TO SEE THIS REAL SUPER-SHOWMAN IN ACTION! ITS AN EXPERIENCE YOU'LL NEVER FORGET.

Please visit The Official Wade Jackson Music Web Site

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From The Desk of BUBBA KUDZU....

Wade Jackson did more entertaining on shows with the GRAND OLE OPRY STAR'S ROAD SHOW in one documented year than many of the other recording stars did on the OPRY BROADCAST itself and was awarded the AIR FORCE COMMENDATION MEDAL (signed by the Vice Commander in Chief and the Secretary of the Air Force) for meritorious service befor he retired. It was Wade's primary military duty to entertain the troops while he served in the Army and the Air Force for more than twenty years. The Military Services regard troop morale and morale building entertainment very seriously and have been known to take fair advantage of talents like Wade Jackson, Faron Young and Jimmy Rogers and many others, while they where in the Military Services. I had the privilage to be with Wade and his Show-Band, "THE STRING KINGS" on a number of their spectacular appearances while he was on duty assignment in Germany. ~Bubba Kudzu ~Hillbilly King of Comedy

One Of Nashville's Greats!

StoneWall Jackson was the first recording artist to record the song, "Don't Be Angry", written by Wade Jackson, witch won two BMI Awards. The first award in 1965 and the second in 1977. (Donna Fargo also had a great hit with "Don't Be Angry.") StoneWall also appeared on the Wade Jackson show with Wade and his "String Kings" band entertaining American Troops in Germany about a year before Wade retired from the military service. The Troops and their families, world wide, realy loved his style. StoneWall also recorded "Red Roses Blooming Back Home", wich he shares the copyright on with Wade Jackson. Wade got the ides for the song while serving in the War in Korea with the 24th Infantry Division where he carried his old guitar and fiddle right on up to the frount line foxhole positions. Grand Ole Opry stars, including Red Sovine, George Morgan, Ernie Ashworth, Grandpa Jones, the great country comedian, "Duke of Paducah and others played state and country fairs. Entertaining at Autitorium Road Show Tours , Wade Jackson opened the show with the help of "NILLIE", his favorite old fiddle. This went on for several summer seasons. Wade was selected because of his ability to warm up the audience in a hurry, witch requires an expearienced showman! Wade at the age of 77 still has this kind magnetic enegery, as I have experinced my time with him this past week. I also learned that Jimmy Rogers, the famous folk singer, was on the same U.S. Air Force entertainment tour with Wade, wich was made up of The Top Talent Conest Winners in the Airforce! Jimmy's songs are still popular to Day. Please Vsite Wades Website at www.wadejacksonmusic.com to decide if you would like more information, sample music. ~Fanny Aliff

Wade and his brother Stonewall

was one of the most popular country stars of the early '60s, scoring a string of Top Ten country hits and becoming a fixture at the Grand Ole Opry with a pleading voice that seemed to reflect his hard, often abusive upbringing on a south Georgia dirt farm. He was named after the Confederate general Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson, to whom he was related according to family legend. When he was ten he traded his bike for a guitar and began making up songs. Some of his later hits, such as "Don't Be Angry," were written very early in his creative life. Jackson began singing professionally in the mid-'50s, moving to Nashville in 1956. Within a few days of his arrival he delivered an unsolicited demonstration recording to the offices of the Acuff-Rose publishing house, and executive Wesley Rose heard his recorded singing and set up an audition for Jackson at the Grand Ole Opry. He became the first entertainer to join the Opry without a recording contract, performing first on the Opry's Friday Night Frolics before his official debut. Backed by Ernest Tubb's Texas Troubadours, he proved so popular that the audience demanded four encores. Eventually Jackson hit the road with Tubb, who became a mentor to the young singer and songwriter. By early 1957, Jackson had signed a recording contract with Columbia Records and cut his first record, "Don't Be Angry." Jackson followed up with a cover of George Jones' "Life to Go," which peaked at number two in early 1959. The upbeat "Waterloo," with its mixture of novelty and melancholy, did even better, spending five weeks at the top of the country charts, hitting number four on the pop charts, and garnering Jackson some national television exposure. Through the early '60s Jackson was a consistent hitmaker with such country standards as "Why I'm Walkin'" (number six, 1960), "A Wound Time Can't Erase" (number three, 1962), and "I Washed My Hands in Muddy Water" (number eight, 1965). Jackson's second number one hit, "B.J. the D.J.," arrived in early 1964. During the second half of the '60s, he reached Top 40 less often, scoring only one Top Ten hit: 1967's "Stamp Out Loneliness". His Columbia albums of this period contained ornate wordplay from the pens of well-established Nashville writers like Vic McAlpin; songs such as "Ship in a Bottle" and "Nevermore Quote the Raven" applied literary virtuosity to traditional country themes. By 1970, however, Jackson wasn't even hitting the Top 40. He bounced back briefly in 1971 with a cover of Lobo's "Me and You and a Dog Named Boo." In 1973, he had his last hit with "Herman Schwartz," which reached number 41. After that, Jackson continued to appear regularly on the Opry and to record occasionally, releasing albums like the inspirational Make Me Like a Child Again. He also re-recorded versions of his old hits, and he privately published his autobiography, From the Bottom Up, in 1991. ~ Sandra Brennan & James Manheim, All Music Guide

GRAND OLE' OPRY Classic Songwritter/ Showman.....

The "legendary" Wade Jackson The Country Classic, "Don't Be Angry", (Sony Publishing), has already won two BMI Awards, and has boosted many bottom lines during the last half century. Incidentally, this is the first song that songwriter/artist Wade Jackson ever wrote. Recorded first in one of Stonewall Jackson's early albums, it soon broke out on a single and it is still active in royalties. The second BMI Award resulted from the HIT by Donna Fargo. Other artists who have recorded "Don't Be Angry" include George Jones, Roy Acuff, Mickey Gilley, Sandy Bull, Nappy Brown, James O'Gwynn and Daniel O'Donnell. Born in a logging camp near Marion, South Carolina, he has been a professional entertainer for more than 42 years, starting long before his enlistment in the military service. Then, all the time he could spare was spent in entertaining his GI buddies all over the world, and on local radio and TV shows when possible. No traveling conditions, working conditions, or inadequate personal accommodations have ever slowed him down or kept him away from doing a show for his fellow troops, or for any other live audience for that matter. From the frozen winters in Grafenwehr, Germany to the rice paddies of Korea, Wade has performed and organized off duty GI bands to play country music shows indoors and outdoors in all kinds of weather. But Wades work and talent for entertaining were not really known to the American people here at home until he started recording professionally and making personal appearances on shows all over the United States and Canada in the Fall of 1966. Since Wades discharge from the military service, he has hung up his be medaled uniform, and explodes onto the stage to do his show with more instruments than it looks possible to carry. To name a few, fiddle, banjo, guitar, harmonica, mandolin, and anything else he can find on the stage. And he never does the show the same way twice. Wade has organized so many bands in the military service, also teaching each man his own instruments, that he seems to have an infinite patience and understanding ability to work with any band, anywhere. Many of the top stars all over the nation, who know Wade, kid him a little when they work on the same stage with him, because he has the showmanship ability to completely steal the show. Be careful of this entertainer, watching him perform and listening to him sing is habit forming. Incidentally, Wade Jackson is one of the most celebrated Country songwriters and has material to his credit, which has been recorded by Sonny James, George Jones, Ernest Tubb, Roy Acuff, Stonewall Jackson and many other artists. The first song he ever wrote was "Don't Be Angry." Wade travels all over with the Grand Ole Opry Road Shows every summer, and makes his base of operations at his home in Gallatin, Tennessee, only 27 miles from Nashville. DON'T EVER MISS A CHANCE TO SEE THIS REAL SUPER-SHOWMAN IN ACTION! ITS AN EXPERIENCE YOU'LL NEVER FORGET.

Wade Jackson

Wade Jackson was one of the most popular country stars of the early '60s, scoring a string of Top Ten country hits and becoming a fixture at the Grand Ole Opry with a pleading voice that seemed to reflect his hard, often abusive upbringing on a south Georgia dirt farm. He was named after the Confederate general Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson, to whom he was related according to family legend. When he was ten he traded his bike for a guitar and began making up songs. Some of his later hits, such as "Don't Be Angry," were written very early in his creative life. Jackson began singing professionally in the mid-'50s, moving to Nashville in 1956. Within a few days of his arrival he delivered an unsolicited demonstration recording to the offices of the Acuff-Rose publishing house, and executive Wesley Rose heard his recorded singing and set up an audition for Jackson at the Grand Ole Opry. He became the first entertainer to join the Opry without a recording contract, performing first on the Opry's Friday Night Frolics before his official debut. Backed by Ernest Tubb's Texas Troubadours, he proved so popular that the audience demanded four encores. Eventually Jackson hit the road with Tubb, who became a mentor to the young singer and songwriter. By early 1957, Jackson had signed a recording contract with Columbia Records and cut his first record, "Don't Be Angry." Jackson followed up with a cover of George Jones' "Life to Go," which peaked at number two in early 1959. The upbeat "Waterloo," with its mixture of novelty and melancholy, did even better, spending five weeks at the top of the country charts, hitting number four on the pop charts, and garnering Jackson some national television exposure. Through the early '60s Jackson was a consistent hitmaker with such country standards as "Why I'm Walkin'" (number six, 1960), "A Wound Time Can't Erase" (number three, 1962), and "I Washed My Hands in Muddy Water" (number eight, 1965). Jackson's second number one hit, "B.J. the D.J.," arrived in early 1964. During the second half of the '60s, he reached Top 40 less often, scoring only one Top Ten hit: 1967's "Stamp Out Loneliness". His Columbia albums of this period contained ornate wordplay from the pens of well-established Nashville writers like Vic McAlpin; songs such as "Ship in a Bottle" and "Nevermore Quote the Raven" applied literary virtuosity to traditional country themes. By 1970, however, Jackson wasn't even hitting the Top 40. He bounced back briefly in 1971 with a cover of Lobo's "Me and You and a Dog Named Boo." In 1973, he had his last hit with "Herman Schwartz," which reached number 41. After that, Jackson continued to appear regularly on the Opry and to record occasionally, releasing albums like the inspirational Make Me Like a Child Again. He also re-recorded versions of his old hits, and he privately published his autobiography, From the Bottom Up, in 1991. ~ Sandra Brennan & James Manheim, All Music Guide